{Crash Course Crochet} Adding Texture to Your Crochet

{Crash Course Crochet} Adding Texture to Your Crochet

I work almost exclusively in single crochet. I make dolls, and that’s the stitching that makes sense to use. Sometimes it gets really boring, and I end up looking for little ways to add texture to my work without sacrificing the composition of the piece. I thought it would be nice to share some of the little and easy things that I do to add a little more pizzaz to my boring single crochet.

Spring Cleaning The Crochet Patterns

Spring Cleaning The Crochet Patterns

I have 70 crochet pattern designs that include free, paid, and unavailable crochet patterns. Holy crap! That’s quite the number. I started designing patterns about 14 years ago, and while I love what I’ve been doing lately, I’m cringing at quite a few of these… okay, more than a few. Some. Of. Them. Are. So. Bad. It’s time to thin out the horrible, and reformat the ones worth saving.

{Crash Course Crochet} Fastening Off Your Yarn When Working In The Round

{Crash Course Crochet} Fastening Off Your Yarn When Working In The Round

Make your edge look STUNNING after putting in all of that awesome crochet work. Since crocheting anything takes forever, don’t you think it’s a shame to leave your finished edge looking unfinished? Simply fastening off your yarn (the usual slip stitch and pull through) leaves a knot. It leaves your beautiful crochet looking like you have more work to do. You can do better, and your talent demands it. DEMANDS IT!

{Crash Course Crochet} Different Weight Yarns Together as One Strand

{Crash Course Crochet} Different Weight Yarns Together as One Strand

I posted some pictures of the puppets I have been making sometime last week, and the reaction was awesome. The main comment that sticks out in my mind is how the yarns held together made a cool effect. I totally agree with this. It does make a really cool effect. I’ve been doing this for years, but this was the first time I had many comments about the yarns and what I was doing. I don’t know, maybe everyone doesn’t crochet like this sometimes? I do it all the time.

{Crash Course Crochet} How to Make a Decreased Single Crochet Stitch

{Crash Course Crochet} How to Make a Decreased Single Crochet Stitch

This is one of the most useful crochet stitches that I have in my crochet tool box. The decreased single crochet (d.sc) stitch allows me to decrease my stitch count, without leaving a gaping hole… the one that would be created by simply skipping a stitch. Being a crocheted doll maker, this is important, because holes cause gaps. Gaps cause your stuffing to show or fall out. I’m a big fan of keeping everything tight. The stitch is useful for all types of crocheting; not just doll work. It’s one of the most useful crochet tools when shaping your work. You can use this stitch to decrease one (or more!) stitch in a few steps. It’s easy enough for a beginning crocheter to master.

{Crash Course Crochet} – Nuts for Picots

{Crash Course Crochet} – Nuts for Picots

I love the little detail adding a picot creates. It’s just so pretty. I’ve been crocheting them “wrong” for years… nothing horrible. I was missing one little step. I would get a very similar effect, but if we’re going to do it, we should do it right. Today’s how to crochet, is how to properly execute a picot stitch (which is really a bunch of little stitches together). If you can single crochet (sc), chain (ch), and slip stitch, (sl st), then you can make a little picot. It adds so much more awesome to your crochet work.